CloudForms in AWS Summary and recap

For the last few posts Laurent Domb has been explaining how to squeeze CloudForms and AWS integration by teaching you how to:

  • Upload the CF images to AWS
  • Create all the needed config files in AWS
  • Deploy CF on AWS
  • Configure the new in 4.6 SmartState Analysis (SSA)
  • Use that SSA to add a compliance policy to an instance
  • Use AWS authentication in CF

 

You can find the blog posts here:

Please let us know what are your thoughts and which other series would you like to read in the blog

Multi-tier Application Deployment using Ansible and CloudForms (Video)

This article is a follow up on our previous blog post VMware provisioning example using Ansible, where we deployed a simple virtual machine on VMware using Ansible from the CloudForms service catalog. In this week’s demonstration, we go a step further and provision a multi-tier application on Amazon Web Services (AWS). Once provisioned, the application lifecycle, as well as all day 2 operations are performed from Red Hat CloudForms.

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Build your Software Defined Data Center with Red Hat CloudForms and OpenStack

A few days ago, Michele Naldini posted a series on the Red Hat Developer Blog about how to build a Software Defined Data Center (SDDC) using Red Hat CloudForms and Red Hat OpenStack Platform.

Red Hat CloudForms allows to more quickly deploy and scale Red Hat OpenStack Platform (also known as OSP) private clouds, combine existing IT infrastructure investments, and federate public cloud deployments. This series includes both background information and hands-on tips to implement a full SDDC in practice.

Continue reading “Build your Software Defined Data Center with Red Hat CloudForms and OpenStack”

My First Ansible Control Action (Video)

With this short video, we continue our series based on Red Hat Knowledge Base articles exploring how to take advantage of Ansible Automation inside Red Hat CloudForms. This post is a follow-up of our previous My First Ansible Service article.

As a summary, what we do in this video is to create a control policy that checks if the VM CPU or memory size has changed, and if so, resets the size to 1 CPU and 1GB automatically.

Continue reading “My First Ansible Control Action (Video)”